Sidewalk Talk
Frank Carbajal on building the Latino future | Frank Carbajal

Frank Carbajal on building the Latino future | Frank Carbajal

March 1, 2021

The Latino community is one that has felt the devastating effects of COVID-19 firsthand. As essential workers and part of a people group that values family and work ethic above all else, the pandemic has wracked this already marginalized minority. But author and founder of EsTiempo: “It’s Time,” Frank Carbajal, is here to tell us that the Latino future is still bright for these resilient individuals. 

On this episode of The Sidewalk Talk podcast, Traci talks with Frank about how his story of resiliency and perseverance is just one of many in the Latino community. The goal of Frank’s work is to uplift as many Latino individuals as possible, and together he and Traci covered all sorts of topics in that vein, from how to combat the negative rhetoric often thrown at the Latino community to why loneliness affects Latinos in a particularly potent way. 

The episode concludes with Frank’s heartfelt story of discovering the humanity of a man who had lost it all, and why he wants to encourage you, the Sidewalk Talk volunteer, to always remember that we all have a story to tell. Frank has some beautiful truths to share, don’t miss this episode! 

 

Episode Milestones

[00:07] Intro 

[00:58] Meet Frank 

[08:00] Frank’s story of resiliency  

[17:21] Building the Latino Future’s impact 

[22:04] Combatting negative rhetoric against the Latino community 

[26:02] Community and loneliness in the Latino population 

[35:34] Frank’s word for you

[41:58] Outro 

 

Resources Mentioned

EsTiempo 

Building the Latino Future: Success Stories for the Next Generation 

 

Standout Quotes from the Episode

“You can’t fail when you’re passionate. There’s no failure in passion.”
—Frank Carbajal 

“I think of my parents when I see the migrant, farm-working community. That’s how my parents made their success. Words and framing matters.”
—Frank Carbajal 

“With support, loneliness means that you’re not alone. You’ll be helped and you’ll be listened to.”
—Frank Carbajal 

“We all have a story to share and we all should be respectful of every human life.”
—Frank Carbajal 

 

Connect:

Find | Sidewalk Talk Podcast

At sidewalk-talk.org

On Instagram: @sidewalktalkorg

On Twitter: @sidewalktalkorg

 

Find | Traci Ruble

At Traciruble.com

On Instagram: @TraciRubleMFT

On Twitter: @TraciRubleMFT

On Facebook: @TraciRubleMFT Read the rest of this entry »

Kern Beare on how to have difficult conversations | Kern Beare

Kern Beare on how to have difficult conversations | Kern Beare

February 22, 2021

Difficult conversations are something that we’ve had to have a lot of over the past four years. But just when it feels like you can’t even listen to someone who believes differently than you anymore, in walks someone like Kern Beare to help you realize maybe we aren’t so divided after all. 

On this episode of The Sidewalk Talk podcast, Traci talks with Kern, author and creator of the Difficult Conversations Project, all about how to have those difficult conversations in light of everything we’ve been through in the past four years, and really, the past few months as well. Difficult Conversations Project was birthed out of the aftermath of the 2016 presidential election when Kern, along with one of his sons, decided to travel the country on a “listening tour,” setting up conversations with a variety of people with a diverse set of belief systems to try to understand how our country could have come to this place of division and hatred. 

In this conversation, Traci and Kern discuss what he learned on that first tour that sparked the creation of Difficult Conversations, how to listen without the need to be right, the push and pull between love of neighbor and the fight for justice, and how we reconcile our capitalist system with a belief that people should always be put first. Whether you’ve had a difficult conversation lately or you’re looking to have these types of conversations better in the future, this podcast episode is for you! 

 

Episode Milestones

[00:07] Intro 

[00:58] Meet Kern 

[07:41] How the 2016 presidential election birthed the Difficult Conversations Project  

[15:02] Listening without needing to be right 

[20:39] The dichotomy between love and justice 

[27:54] Kern’s thoughts on the 2020 presidential election 

[31:48] Capitalism versus a people-first approach 

[36:52] Kern’s word for you 

[39:29] Outro 

 

Resources Mentioned

Difficult Conversations Project 

Difficult Conversations: The art and science of working together

 

Standout Quotes from the Episode

“The intention of life is to be loving, totally loving. And to be totally loving we have to deal with the parts of ourselves that get in the way of being totally loving.”
—Kern Beare 

“The fundamental problem is a lack of relationship and a lack of connection. I saw the ability to engage in difficult conversations as a process for healing that disconnection.”
—Kern Beare 

“Difficult conversations trigger our flight, flee, freeze survival drive.”
—Kern Beare 

“A window’s been opened up, that if we don’t take advantage of, we’re going to really regret it. And we need to do more to reach out to one another, to connect with each other. We can’t think that, oh now we can relax.”
—Kern Beare 

“We are fully capable of meeting the moment. And I think we need to have faith in ourselves to meet this moment.”
—Kern Bearne 

 

Connect:

Find | Sidewalk Talk Podcast

At sidewalk-talk.org

On Instagram: @sidewalktalkorg

On Twitter: @sidewalktalkorg

 

Find | Traci Ruble

At Traciruble.com

On Instagram: @TraciRubleMFT

On Twitter: @TraciRubleMFT

On Facebook: @TraciRubleMFT

Lambers Fisher teaches us how to empathize and heal our political divides | Lambers Fisher

Lambers Fisher teaches us how to empathize and heal our political divides | Lambers Fisher

February 15, 2021

Our world is more diverse than ever before, which is a good thing, but we’re also growing increasingly more divided within that diversity of thought, background, belief, and life experience. How do we become bridge-builders in a world that touts our differences as reasons to hate the other? Therapist and speaker, Lambers Fisher, has a few ideas. 

On this episode of The Sidewalk Talk podcast, Traci sits down with Lambers to talk about empathy and how we bridge the gaps that seek to divide us. Throughout their conversation, Lambers and Traci hit on some hot-button topics, including how to own our own feelings and stances on an issue while still making space for someone to disagree with us, knowing our capacity for being a bridge-builder, and their thoughts on how to get past the divides caused and amplified by the most recent presidential election. 

Through it all, Lambers emphasized the expansion of empathy as his “why,” and the answer to so many of the connection problems plaguing our country and society. Looking for a prominent voice seeking to build up relationships, even when we disagree, rather than tear them down? Don’t miss this episode of The Sidewalk Talk podcast. 

 

Episode Milestones

[00:07] Intro 

[00:59] Meet Lambers 

[06:04] Expressing our feelings of difference 

[11:15] Owning our feelings and maintaining our stance while empathizing with the other 

[18:02] Lambers’ why: expanding empathy 

[19:11] Getting past our divides from the presidential election 

[31:57] Listening to understand the other side and share vulnerability 

[35:57] Knowing when and how to be a bridge-builder 

[42:39] Lambers’ word for you 

[45:13] Outro 

 

Resources Mentioned

Diversity Made Simple

 

Standout Quotes from the Episode

“Our differences don’t have to be divides. We can say, ‘yes, we’re different, but we also have similarities.’”
—Lambers Fisher 

“We won’t know everything all the time, but if we’re open to learning along the way then other people will see that receptivity and say, ‘okay, maybe there’s something to that.’”
—Lambers Fisher 

“My big ‘why’ is to hopefully create relationship standards that are a lot harder to break. I want there to be so much empathy, that it’s contagious.”
—Lambers Fisher 

“You can’t discount the legitimacy of someone’s feelings just because they expressed it in a way you don’t prefer. We have to give safe place for that.”
—Lambers Fisher 

“I believe that we all have the capacity to empathize in some way. Is it as much as you want or need in the moment? I don’t know. But you won’t know until you try.”
—Lambers Fisher 

“Relationship-building matters. It plants seeds that impact every relationship they’ll have.”
—Lambers Fisher 

 

Connect:

Find | Sidewalk Talk Podcast

At sidewalk-talk.org

On Instagram: @sidewalktalkorg

On Twitter: @sidewalktalkorg

 

Find | Traci Ruble

At Traciruble.com

On Instagram: @TraciRubleMFT

On Twitter: @TraciRubleMFT

On Facebook: @TraciRubleMFT

Sara Huang gives us permission to encounter our inner diversity | Sara Huang

Sara Huang gives us permission to encounter our inner diversity | Sara Huang

February 8, 2021

At times it might seem like our society is more divided than ever before, and while that might be the case, there are still people out there like Bureau Twist’s Sara Huang whose sole aim is to unite where we are divided and make peace where there is conflict. 

On this episode of Sidewalk Talk, Traci chats with her good friend and colleague, Sara, on how exactly she does what she does as a facilitator for teams and an advocate for promoting diversity and deep democracy in the most unlikely places. During their conversation, Traci and Sara hit on everything from what deep democracy means to Sara and how to confront your inner Donald Trump to finding that necessary permission to encounter your own inner diversity and remaining your centered self in the midst of adverse circumstances. 

The two wrapped up their time together by discussing how not to become the oppressor in a culture that rewards such behavior, and Sara’s wisdom for you, the Sidewalk Talk listener: tuning into the other person and putting yourself in their place. In a time fraught with division, Sara’s voice is one we all need in our lives today.  

 

Episode Milestones

[00:07] Intro 

[01:01] Meet Sara 

[08:01] Sara’s take on “deep democracy” 

[22:29] Permission to encounter our inner diversity 

[30:56] Identities we cling to

[38:10] Not becoming the oppressor 

[41:27] How Sara remains in her centered self 

[46:21] Sara’s wisdom for you 

[49:07] Outro 

 

Resources Mentioned

Bureau Twist

 

Standout Quotes from the Episode

“We cannot change what we don’t know. It’s also okay to have compassion for yourself and others when encountered with these blind spots.”
—Sara Huang 

“On our path of embracing, such a big part of that is embracing ourselves.”
—Sara Huang 

“To have that curiosity, to lean into it, and to show the way without dictating the way.”
—Sara Huang 

“Never underestimate the power of naming. Naming it without the urge to fix it.”
—Sara Huang 

“I see you. You have a message. I’m not sure what it is exactly, but I’m going to find out.”
—Sara Huang 

“Tune into the other. Imagine that you’re there. Listen to the energy in the voice.”
—Sara Huang 

 

Connect:

Find | Sidewalk Talk Podcast

At sidewalk-talk.org

On Instagram: @sidewalktalkorg

On Twitter: @sidewalktalkorg

 

Find | Traci Ruble

At Traciruble.com

On Instagram: @TraciRubleMFT

On Twitter: @TraciRubleMFT

On Facebook: @TraciRubleMFT

A conversation on spiritual practice in today’s world | Philip Goldberg

A conversation on spiritual practice in today’s world | Philip Goldberg

February 1, 2021

When many of us hear the phrase “spiritual practice” we automatically think of monks hiding away from the world, an ashram in India, or spending our whole lives in silent meditation and mindfulness. Renowned author and speaker Philip Goldberg is here to tell us that though spiritual practice can be, and is, all of those things, it’s also a habit we can bring to our crazy everyday lives as parents, students, employees, and people in the 21st century. 

On this episode of The Sidewalk Talk podcast, Traci chats with Philip on all things spiritual practice, drawing heavily on his newest, and increasingly relevant, book, Spiritual Practice for Crazy Times. Throughout their conversation the two debunk some of the most common stereotypes many of us have about spiritual practice, go over some of Philip’s favorite and most practical ways to integrate a spiritual practice into your life, and discuss appropriation in spiritual practice and how to best honor the cultures and peoples some of our most common spiritual practices come from. 

Spiritual practices are not something far off and unattainable for most of us. Instead, they’re so needed in our increasing crazy world, maybe now more than ever. We hope you find this conversation enlightening and thought-provoking—one that inspires you to start, or continue on, in your own spiritual practice of choice. 

 

Episode Milestones

[00:07] Intro 

[01:01] Meet Philip 

[03:26] Spiritual Practice for Crazy Times 

[05:17] Debunking the stereotypes of spiritual practice 

[11:42] Relationship between spiritual life and anger 

[16:41] Philip’s practical spiritual practices 

[25:00] Bringing intentionality to your spiritual practice 

[27:43] Surrendering ego in service as a spiritual practice 

[29:48] Appropriation in spiritual practice 

[40:24] Philip’s word for you

[43:52] Outro 

 

Resources Mentioned

Spiritual Practice for Crazy Times: Practical tools to cultivate calm, clarity, and courage 

The Life of Yogananda: The story of the yogi who became the first modern guru 

American Veda: From Emerson and the Beatles to yoga and meditation how Indian spirituality changed the west  

 

Standout Quotes from the Episode

“I’m unconventional in that I honor the individuality of everybody’s spiritual perspective and spiritual past and happily draw from anything that works.”
—Philip Goldberg 

“Spiritual practices give us a stronger foundation of strength, and inner stability, and calmness of mind so that we can engage in the world without losing our stability, thereby being more effective.”
—Philip Goldberg 

“Whether something is spiritual depends as much on what you bring to it as the thing itself.”
—Philip Goldberg 

“Are the teachings being transmitted with integrity? Or are they being diluted, and distorted, and corrupted for commercial purposes?”
—Philip Goldberg 

“Deep within yourselves, deep within all of us, at our core, our essence, is a sanctuary of peace and a fortress of strength. There are many methods through which we can access that sanctuary on a regular basis and as needed. By doing so we can bring more of the best parts of ourselves, our love, our compassion, our inner peace, our joy, our openness, our empathy to the world and to the other people we connect with.”
—Philip Goldberg  

 

Connect:

Find | Sidewalk Talk Podcast

At sidewalk-talk.org

On Instagram: @sidewalktalkorg

On Twitter: @sidewalktalkorg

 

Find | Traci Ruble

At Traciruble.com

On Instagram: @TraciRubleMFT

On Twitter: @TraciRubleMFT

On Facebook: @TraciRubleMFT

 

The duality of narcissism and how to elevate trust in our relationships | Dr. Keith Campbell

The duality of narcissism and how to elevate trust in our relationships | Dr. Keith Campbell

January 25, 2021

Over the last few years, narcissism, specifically narcissism in our leadership, has become top of mind for many Americans. As trust in our institutions has waned, narcissism has skyrocketed. On this episode of The Sidewalk Talk podcast, Traci sits down with Dr. Keith Campbell, a scientist and author who specializes in none other than the study of narcissism and its effects on our relationships and the larger culture around us. 

Traci and Keith’s conversation begins with why Keith chose to study narcissism and how this area of thought has evolved over the years since he began his research. In the interim Keith’s written a number of books on the subject, including his newest: The New Science of Narcissism that he hopes will help readers identify the narcissistic tendencies in their own lives. 

The podcast wraps up with Keith and Traci’s examination of narcissism in leadership, its rise over the last four years of President Trump’s term, and a look at narcissism in capitalism. Finally, Keith leaves us with a word about daring to take ourselves a little less seriously in the name of genuine connection and building trust. We hope you come away from this conversation with a better understanding of narcissism and its presence in our lives and culture. 

 

Episode Milestones

[00:07] Intro 

[00:59] Meet Keith 

[03:53] Why Keith chose to study narcissism 

[05:26] What’s “new” in narcissism 

[09:40] Why we’re all a little narcissistic 

[11:24] Keith’s hope for readers of The New Science of Narcissism 

[13:28] Narcissism in leadership 

[19:01] Cultural/societal inputs that affect narcissism 

[23:55] Does capitalism encourage narcissism? 

[30:13] How to elevate trust in relationships 

[35:47] Keith’s word for you 

[38:27] Outro 

 

Resources Mentioned

 

Standout Quotes from the Episode

“We have these two forms of narcissism out there, and the mistake people are making is that these are the same people, when the truth is, they’re really two different groups of people.”
—Dr. Keith Campbell 

“We’ve had lots of very narcissistic presidents. The narcissistic leaders get a lot done, for good or ill. They also get impeached more.”
—Dr. Keith Campbell 

“Ego can help you sometimes, but it can do such interpersonal damage.”
—Dr. Keith Campbell 

“You can harness your own ego to make the world better.”
—Dr. Keith Campbell 

“It’s important, if you want to connect with people, to take yourself a little less seriously.”
—Dr. Keith Campbell 

 

Connect:

Find | Sidewalk Talk Podcast

At sidewalk-talk.org

On Instagram: @sidewalktalkorg

On Twitter: @sidewalktalkorg

 

Find | Traci Ruble

At Traciruble.com

On Instagram: @TraciRubleMFT

On Twitter: @TraciRubleMFT

On Facebook: @TraciRubleMFT

On mothering, nature, and being on the same team | Jill Doneen Clifton

On mothering, nature, and being on the same team | Jill Doneen Clifton

January 18, 2021

Being a mother is one of the hardest and most sacred callings women will ever experience. It’s an undertaking made all the more difficult by the mixed-messages and unhelpful advice parents the world over seem to be inundated with in today’s culture of “mommy wars,” parenting blogs, and the pressure to raise Instagrammable kids. 

Scientist-turned-writer Jill Doneen Clifton wants to take guilt and comparison out of the mothering equation. On this episode of The Sidewalk Talk podcast, Jill and Traci sit down to talk about Jill’s book, Landscape of Mothers and how motherhood and nature are so intricately connected. Throughout their conversation, the two also debunk the myth of good and bad mothers, talk about painful mothering experiences, and discuss being a mother to everyone—whether you’re a mother in the biological sense or not. Jill concludes the interview with an expression of her deep gratitude for you, the Sidewalk Talk volunteers, and all you do to spread love and hope in the world. 

 

Episode Milestones

[00:07] Intro 

[00:58] Meet Jill 

[03:40] Landscape of Mothers 

[05:58] The relationship between nature and mothering 

[13:40] Different wisdoms in parenting and the idea of good and bad mothers  

[19:06] Painful mothering experiences and how to get on the same team 

[28:33] Hopes for mothers reading Landscape of Mothers 

[32:00] Being a mother to anyone and everyone 

[38:12] Jill’s deep gratitude for you 

[42:10] Outro 

 

Resources Mentioned

Standout Quotes from the Episode

“That’s where Landscape of Mothers came from—this sense of needing a map, wanting a way to move and a way to explore the things I just didn’t know, and yet have it be cohesive and coherent and feel like I was actually going somewhere even though I was kind of in the unknown.”
—Jill Doneen Clifton 

“For the most part, I don’t really believe in the concept of a good mother or a bad mother.”
—Jill Doneen Clifton 

Landscape of Mothers is really an invitation to bring it back to ourselves and to do it our own way. It’s about finding out where we’re at and what we’re capable of and what we want.”
—Jill Doneen Clifton 

“We perceive parenting a child as someone’s individual responsibility, and I think there’s a deep wound in there.”
—Jill Doneen Clifton 

“For me, mothering isn’t what women do with children. It’s how all of us care for, nourish, and nurture each other.”
—Jill Doneen Clifton 

 

Connect:

Find | Sidewalk Talk Podcast

At sidewalk-talk.org

On Instagram: @sidewalktalkorg

On Twitter: @sidewalktalkorg

 

Find | Traci Ruble

At Traciruble.com

On Instagram: @TraciRubleMFT

On Twitter: @TraciRubleMFT

On Facebook: @TraciRubleMFT

When Wisdom Meets Innocence | Brad Montague

When Wisdom Meets Innocence | Brad Montague

January 11, 2021

Take a moment to ponder. Do you see as I say there’s sweetness in subtleties and matchless beauty in authenticity? 

And if you think you’re nothing, know this- the world needs you to dazzle and all that you’ve got accumulates to incredible magic!

Listen in as Traci interviews  Author, Illustrator and Creator Brad Montague, who’s also the man behind the revolutionary web series Kid President- a show that exemplifies the change we can bring to the world by bringing kids and adults to work together. Brad has authored the much-loved book, “Becoming Better Grown-ups'' and is the force behind ‘Socktober’, a worldwide annual drive connecting people to their local homeless shelters. Each year millions of people take part in providing basic human needs to men, women, and children without homes in a community-driven project where people take part for no reward or recognition but only for the good of their neighbors who are homeless. A living example of human wisdom and experience combined with infinite innocence, Brad offers delightful words of positivity that carve a well of joy deep within our insides.

Join them as they discuss life, kids, illustrations and Brad’s beautiful journey in life so far. Also take with yourself a little bundle of joy as Brad gives away gifts of beautiful advice! 

 

Episode Milestones

[02:51] Does Brad talk to his inner kid a lot?

[04:49] Brad reads to us his favorite spots from his book

[11:39] Traci shares the special reason for her fondness to Brad 

[15:05] How Brad became the modern day Fred Rogers

[18:46] Brad discusses a memorable experience he had recently

[22:02] On deciding to write kids’ books

[28:11] Brad’s version of empathy and letting people know they matter

[31:06] How do you cultivate the fierceness of heart to be loving?

[36:21] Brad’s little gift of advice for you!

 

Resources Mentioned

Standout Quotes from the Episode

“I had to learn that in the same way a child expresses themselves, just because they want to, it's like a gift. It's something like an urge.” – Brad Montague [06:29]

“I want to be a heart centered person. I hope that I am.” – Brad Montague [07:25]

“I feel less alone. I also think listening on the sidewalk has helped me move out of fixing people. And really recognizing that, gosh, if I just see people all the way and remove all the limitations in me that might prevent me from seeing them, that in and of itself is the magic. ” – Traci [08:46]

“I have always been fascinated by the strength that it takes to be tender, the boldness in being gentle.” Brad Montague [16:06]

“If we nurture that, if we notice that, if we really celebrate those little bitty things that are happening every day that are holding society together, it will grow. ”– Brad Montague [25:18]

 

Connect:

Find | Sidewalk Talk Podcast

At sidewalk-talk.org

On Instagram: @sidewalktalkorg

On Twitter: @sidewalktalkorg

 

Find | Traci Ruble

At Traciruble.com

On Instagram: @TraciRubleMFT

On Twitter: @TraciRubleMFT

On Facebook: @TraciRubleMFT

Connection and belonging: a necessary and insightful conversation | Jane Cunningham

Connection and belonging: a necessary and insightful conversation | Jane Cunningham

December 28, 2020

Connection and belonging are two very human things that are continuing to slip away in our modern Western culture of increased screen time and decreased face-to-face interaction. Self-proclaimed “soul worker” Jane Cunningham is doing her part to reverse that trend. 

In this episode of Sidewalk Talk, Traci sits down with Cunningham for a conversation on human connection, our mutual desire for belonging, and how we can strive for both even in the midst of a global pandemic. With their shared interest in polyvagal theory and Maori culture, the two women invite listeners into a conversation that will deepen our understanding of self and open doors to discovering who we truly are. 

 

Episode Milestones

[00:09] Intro 

[01:01] Meet Jane Cunningham 

[06:12] Jane’s take on polyvagal theory 

[10:30] The tension between our individual freedom and our community well-being when it comes to COVID-19 

[12:24] The notion of belonging as something we’re creating 

[16:28] How our self is shaped by the over-culture of where we’re from 

[18:58] The acknowledgement of soul as part of the human experience  

[20:46] Jane’s connection to Maori culture and reconnecting others to the divine 

[27:10] Discovering where you come from as a means to discover self 

[33:00] The struggle to win belonging through perfection 

[35:24] Reshaping storytelling in our culture 

[41:12] Getting better at feeling, not just feeling better 

[43:13] Jane’s word for you 

[47:51] Outro 

 

Resources Mentioned

Standout Quotes from the Episode

“Belonging is a crucial part of what makes us feel safe. And when we feel safe, we’re more able to think clearly and use this developed part of our brain in service of not only ourselves, but each other.”
—Jane Cunningham 

“If we only think about what serves me and I don’t care about you over there, then we don’t have that belonging, which is that crucial part of functioning from that more recent, more developed part of our brain. We’ve got to think about community.”
—Jane Cunningham 

“Our souls have a longing to remember our connection. I think the longing and remembering are what we are hungering for.”
—Jane Cunningham 

“There’s something about modern Western culture that kind of chips away at all of us. Not to the same extent, but we’re asked to not be human. We’re supposed to be perfect.”
—Jane Cunningham 

“What you’re doing out there on the sidewalk—whether you’re the listener of the storyteller—what you’re doing is healing our cultural wounds. You’re doing sacred work.”
—Jane Cunningham 

 

Connect:

Find | Sidewalk Talk Podcast

At sidewalk-talk.org

On Instagram: @sidewalktalkorg

On Twitter: @sidewalktalkorg

 

Find | Traci Ruble

At Traciruble.com

On Instagram: @TraciRubleMFT

On Twitter: @TraciRubleMFT

On Facebook: @TraciRubleMFT

A conversation on mental health in the church | Rev. Barbara F. Meyers

A conversation on mental health in the church | Rev. Barbara F. Meyers

December 21, 2020

Mental health isn’t a subject that’s addressed among church congregations all that often. But if it was up to Reverend Barbara F. Meyers, that silence wouldn’t be the norm. A Sidewalk Talk volunteer and author of the book Held: Showing up for Each Other’s Mental Health, Rev. Meyers’ goal with everyone she meets—from the sidewalk to the sanctuary—is to make the world a little friendlier place. 

Listen to today’s episode as Traci talks with Meyers, her longtime friend, about Meyers’ own mental health struggles, putting Held out into the world, and her biggest wish for everyone listening. Especially if you work in or are involved with a church, this is an important conversation you won’t want to miss! 

 

Episode Milestones

[00:09] Intro

[00:57] Meet Rev. Barbara F. Meyers 

[03:48] Barbara’s mental health story 

[13:15] Intro to Held book 

[15:15] Barbara’s Sidewalk Talk stories  

[20:32] Differences between church, clinic, and sidewalk when it comes to mental health conversations

[26:32] Barbara starting her own Sidewalk Talk groups in Freemont, CA 

[29:12] How to listen, but not take in, everyone’s personal angst 

[32:38] Barbara’s wish for you

[33:41] Outro 

 

Resources Mentioned

Standout Quotes from the Episode

“My fondest wish is that people would read [Held] in their congregations and find ways of helping other folks to follow some of the lessons, or not do some of the things that I say are harmful.”
—Barbara Meyers 

“When we first started sitting out on the sidewalk, I think people were really wary of us! They probably thought, ‘what are these two white, elderly ladies doing here?’”
—Barbara Meyers  

“I’m just there for a couple hours a week, but you think of the people that are there every day out on the sidewalk—sometimes out there all night long, too—and wow, what they have to deal with in their life is just unfathomable. If there’s any way I can make the world a little friendlier for someone like that, I will.”
—Barbara Meyers 

“I wish you would find something in your life that you were meant to do on this earth. Because once you find that and you know that’s who you are and why you’re here, nothing’s going to stop you from making it happen.”
—Barbara Meyers 

 

Connect:

Find | Sidewalk Talk Podcast

At sidewalk-talk.org

On Instagram: @sidewalktalkorg

On Twitter: @sidewalktalkorg

 

Find | Traci Ruble

At Traciruble.com

On Instagram: @TraciRubleMFT

On Twitter: @TraciRubleMFT

On Facebook: @TraciRubleMFT

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