Sidewalk Talk
Seeking Wonder with Andrea Scher

Seeking Wonder with Andrea Scher

November 22, 2022

Andrea Scher is a writer, artist and life coach whose work is driven by her belief in the transformative power of wonder for creativity and wellbeing. For nearly two decades, through her award-winning blog Superhero Journal, her international workshops, her Creative Superheroes podcast, and bestselling e-courses, she has thrilled others with their own power to find magic all around them.

Join this conversation for a celebration of joy, love, friendship and the wonder of wonder.

 

Episode Timeline

  • [00:09] Intro 
  • [0:57] Meet Andrea
  • [3:20] A peek inside Andrea’s birthday and book release party
  • [4:43] How Andrea’s experiences of depression and anxiety led her to become a seeker of wonder
  • [6:26] Who Andrea is in the world 
  • [8:12] How Andrea leads people to their own joy and delight
  • [9:27] How to recognise a Full Body Yes
  • [10:37] How Andrea used her Full Body Yes to meet some extraordinary people through online dating
  • [11:36] Desire tracking (and what gets in the way of us doing it)
  • [13:00] The people who have most inspired Andrea
  • [17:34] The creative spark that birthed Andrea’s book
  • [21:14] Putting on your Wonder Goggles
  • [26:11] Negativity bias
  • [29:27] How we can cultivate wonder in our relationships
  • [30:54] Andrea’s (platonic) rendezvous with a beautiful man on a flight from Milan
  • [37:34] Andrea’s message to the Sidewalk Talk volunteers
  • [39:49] Closing
  • [40:44] Outro

 

Resources Mentioned

Wonder Seeker (Andrea’s book)

Superhero Journal (Andrea’s blog)

 

Standout Quotes

  • “I think what I like to do is help people move toward their delight and move toward what feels joyful for them, what feels delicious to them.” (Andrea)
  • “a lot of times we're just living this life in this sort of default, unconscious way, and we're not pursuing what actually makes us feel joyful. So that's what I'm sort of orienting people toward.” (Andrea)
  • “Isn't the body amazing at giving us cues and how often we're living in our heads?” (Traci)
  • “We’re not even tracking our own desire and our own wanting, because we're already thinking about, well, what does this other person need and what do they want and what's convenient for them?” (Andrea)
  • “I'm so grateful that this dream happened when I turned 50 because I feel like I can hold the joy of it fully.” (Andrea)
  • “It's not an accidental thing that when you invite it in and put yourself in the way of wonder, you actually set your life up to have more and more of it.” (Traci)
  • “we need to train our brain to also scan for what's good and what's beautiful and what's working in order to sort of, like, kind of balance the scales neurologically so that we have a chance at feeling more joy.” (Andrea)
  • “There's a way that your life is always speaking to us, whether that means, like, our higher self is speaking to us, our spirit is speaking to us, or the mystery, it really doesn't matter how you name it, but yeah, I think that's so beautiful and absolutely the way I move through the world, and it feels like magic.” (Andrea)
  • “Curiosity is key because we think we know things. We think we know. We think we know what wonder means. We think we know who our partner is. We think there's nothing new to discover.” (Andrea) 
  • “finding our wonder inside of the messiness is exactly where we need to tend it most. So tending our joy, tending our wonder is crucial at moments like this.” (Andrea)

 

Connect:

Find | Sidewalk Talk 

At sidewalk-talk.org

On Instagram: @sidewalktalkorg

On Twitter: @sidewalktalkorg

 

Find | Traci Ruble

At Traciruble.com

On Instagram: @TraciRubleMFT

On Twitter: @TraciRubleMFT

On Facebook: @TraciRubleMFT

 

Find | Andrea Scher

At www.andreascher.com 

On Instagram: @AndreaScher

 

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Why I don’t want to die anymore with Johnny Crowder

Why I don’t want to die anymore with Johnny Crowder

November 10, 2022

Johnny Crowder is a suicide and abuse survivor. You've probably seen him. He's tatted up, and he's been a TEDx speaker. Johnny’s a billboard charting rock musician and a certified Recovery peer specialist. But what he's most known for is as the founder and CEO of Cope Notes, which is an online mental health platform that provides daily support to people in over 100 countries around the world.

If you have ever doubted whether you matter (and let’s be honest, how many of us haven’t?), this episode will be a balm for you. Johnny brings rock n roll vibes, vulnerability and a wisdom beyond his years to this emotional and essential conversation.

 

Episode Timeline

  • [00:09] Intro 
  • [0:58] Meet Johnny
  • [4:31] Johnny’s reflections on how entrepreneurship is one of the most challenging of human experiences
  • [5:57] Johnny’s relationship with his mental health (“not lovers, but roommates”)
  • [8:14] Traci’s own experiences with her mental health
  • [11:16] Johnny’s simple realisation that inspired him to create Cope Notes 
  • [13:11] Tech companies and rock stars (Johnny’s unique way of bringing together his identities)
  • [18:29] What Johnny’s learnt about human needs for connection
  • [20:48] Johnny’s reflections on his (and our) needs for relationship and support
  • [27:47] Johnny’s experience of sexual abuse… and then eventually starting a romantic relationship
  • [34:52] The familiarity of drama and intensity when we don’t believe we matter
  • [40:12] How the You Matter sentiment would solve 90% of human suffering
  • [41:21] Closing
  • [42:58] Outro

 

Resources Mentioned

Why I don’t want to die anymore (Johnny’s Tedx Talk)

Cope Notes

 

Standout Quotes

  • “I would estimate that entrepreneurship is one of the most physically and mentally and emotionally challenging things and spiritually challenging things that anybody could ever embark on.” (Johnny) 
  • “Imagine doing like a tough mudder competition where you're like climbing stuff and you're running swimming through this muck and you're exhausted and your feet are blistered and stuff, and you come out the other end, and when you get to the finish line, the finish line is the start of the Boston Marathon. And you're like what?” (Johnny)
  • “I actually find people struggling with mental illness to be having a healthy response to a very sick society.” (Traci)
  • “So if I really wanted to analyze my fierce pursuit of changing the world, it is half because I have a deep empathy for people who are just feeling the same kind of stuff that I am. But there has to be some component in there that I'm not aware of that's, like, wanting to feel like it's a good thing that I was born.” (Johnny)
  • “If I felt like I deserved nice things and I was enough and I've done enough, I would be the most chill human being on the planet.” (Johnny)

 

Connect:

Find | Sidewalk Talk 

At sidewalk-talk.org

On Instagram: @sidewalktalkorg

On Twitter: @sidewalktalkorg

 

Find | Traci Ruble

At Traciruble.com

On Instagram: @TraciRubleMFT

On Twitter: @TraciRubleMFT

On Facebook: @TraciRubleMFT

 

Find | Johnny Crowder

At https://johnnycrowder.com/ 

On Instagram: @JohnnyCrowderLovesYou

 

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High Conflict (and how we get out) with Amanda Ripley

High Conflict (and how we get out) with Amanda Ripley

October 25, 2022

Amanda Ripley is a New York Times bestselling author, an investigative journalist, and the co-founder of Good Conflict, LLC. She writes for the Atlantic, the Washington Post, and Politico, and she spent a decade writing about human behavior for Time magazine in New York, Washington, and Paris.

Listen in as Amanda and Traci explore what High Conflict is (and how we get out) drawing on research, insights, and experience across astronauts on space missions (yes, really!), the Israeli-Palestine conflict, intimate relationships across political divides, gang warfare, and racism.

 

Episode Timeline

  • [00:09] Intro 
  • [0:58] Meet Amanda
  • [3:44] Amanda’s journey to becoming a writer - and how she’s not like Stephen King
  • [8:14] Journalism, Conflict Entrepreneurship, and our need to matter
  • [10:17] Gossip: the art of creating intimacy through a common enemy
  • [11:46] Conflict in space missions (NASA studies with astronauts)
  • [15:09] “Us versus them” and dehumanization
  • [15:50] Curtis Toller’s story of gang rivalry… and redemption
  • [19:38] The paradox of internal and external conflict
  • [22:00] The “exhausted majority” who want less toxicity in politics
  • [23:40] Sidewalk Talk’s Wish you knew Me project, designed for couples who have conflict around politics or vaccines
  • [27:12] Bringing Black and white communities together in the wake of George Floyd’s murder
  • [29:20] The impact of positional power on the need to be heard 
  • [31:38] The art of political speech
  • [33:35] Social media and automatic responses
  • [39:32] Friendship, stereotyping, and how a lack of listening shuts down conversations
  • [41:35] Learning to dialogue differently around issues of righteous callout… like racism, vaccines, mask-wearing.
  • [45.09] Amanda’s message to the Sidewalk Talk volunteers
  • [47:14] Closing
  • [48:01] Outro

Resources Mentioned

High Conflict: Why we get trapped, and how we get out (Amanda’s book)

 

Standout Quotes

  • “you'll never get out of external conflict until you work on the internal conflict” (Amanda)
  • “I feel like that's why we're in this situation. We'd rather just continue othering.” (Traci)
  • “Meanwhile there's this “exhausted majority”... who really want major social change and they want less toxicity in the conflict. So both at once they don't necessarily want moderation or centrism, but they want less toxicity, less dehumanization.” (Amanda)
  • “There’s something like 40 million Americans who stopped speaking to someone in their lives over the 2016 election.” (Traci)
  • “So we're not marrying, dating, or living next to or working with people of other political persuasions is a big problem.” (Traci)
  • “yes, you shouldn't let people get away with saying racist things. And what do you say in response? Like, where is the skill, the craft, the learning, the education, the nuance of sophistication emotional, intellectual around what you say, how you respond to that?” (Amanda)
  • “We could make lasting change that really solves racism in America or dehumanization of any kind by developing the capacity to dialogue differently.” (Traci)
  • “When you really listen to someone, even if you disagree, there is something that opens up. There's an opening that happens in your mind and in your heart. And most people who experience that kind of opening across a big difference want more of it. It's almost like a drug, like a very good drug.” (Amanda)

 

Connect:

Find | Sidewalk Talk 

At sidewalk-talk.org

On Instagram: @sidewalktalkorg

On Twitter: @sidewalktalkorg

 

Find | Traci Ruble

At Traciruble.com

On Instagram: @TraciRubleMFT

On Twitter: @TraciRubleMFT

On Facebook: @TraciRubleMFT

 

Find | Amanda Ripley

At https://www.amandaripley.com/ 

On Twitter: @AmandaRipley

 

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Rule Makers and Rule Breakers with Michele Gelfand

Rule Makers and Rule Breakers with Michele Gelfand

October 19, 2022

Michele Gelfand is a Professor at Stanford University, and an expert on negotiation and cross-cultural psychology. Her book Rule Makers, Rule Breakers explores how tight and loose cultures wire our world, and in doing so offers unique insights on how we might bridge today’s cultural divides.

Michele and Traci chat about the impact of culture on everything from international negotiation to couple’s arguments over chores… in a wide-ranging and fascinating conversation that might just shift how you see yourself and the people around you.

Episode Timeline

  • [00:09] Intro 
  • [0:58] Meet Michele
  • [3:33] “Tight” and “loose” culture as a puzzle
  • [5:25] Michele and Traci share traveling stories and how they illuminate cultural differences (and subcultural similarities)
  • [8:58] What is culture?
  • [10:19] How countries develop a tight or loose culture
  • [12:17] How understanding culture can create empathy
  • [16:27] The polarization at play in the USA’s culture
  • [17:40] Why experiencing threat can lead people to want a tighter culture
  • [19:31] Michele shares the behind-the-scenes of a fascinating study challenging the views of people from Pakistan and the USA have of each other
  • [21:33] Cultural intelligence as a way of connecting more deeply
  • [26:32] How tight and loose cultures responded to the pandemic
  • [29:16] Getting curious about psychology in international negotiating 
  • [34:07] Negotiations in couples (the impact of leaning tight or loose)
  • [35:45] Household chores and the surprising thing they reveal about attitudes and culture
  • [40:51] The relationship between rules and social class
  • [44:48] Michele’s life advice (including a touching reflection from her late father-in-law)
  • [47:35] Closing
  • [48:01] Outro

Resources Mentioned

Rule Makers, Rule Breakers (Michele’s book)

Standout Quotes

  • “Cultural intelligence is critical for connection because then you're really open-minded to people's lives and why they evolved the way they did. And it's really hard sometimes not to be judgmental.” (Michele)
  • “In the US, individualism and doing your own thing is so part of the culture. And partly it's something that we've inherited because we have more wealth than other cultures and so in contexts where there's not a lot of wealth, you need to have strong support. You need to kind of help out the family. Like, it's just absolutely necessary.” (Michele)
  • “there's less debt and there's less alcoholism, less obesity in tighter cultures.” (Michele)
  • “loose cultures did far worse during COVID. But loose cultures are really open and creative and tolerant.” (Michele)

Connect:

Find | Sidewalk Talk 

At sidewalk-talk.org

On Instagram: @sidewalktalkorg

On Twitter: @sidewalktalkorg

 

Find | Traci Ruble

At Traciruble.com

On Instagram: @TraciRubleMFT

On Twitter: @TraciRubleMFT

On Facebook: @TraciRubleMFT

 

Find | Michele Gelfand

At https://www.michelegelfand.com/ 

On Twitter: @MicheleJGefland

 

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Sensitive Striving with Melody Wilding

Sensitive Striving with Melody Wilding

October 11, 2022

Melody Wilding is an executive coach for Sensitive Strivers - smart, sensitive high-achievers who are tired of getting in their own way. Melody is a Sensitive Striver herself, a licensed social worker, professor of Human Behavior and a contributor to Harvard Business Review, Forbes, and Business Insider. She’s also the author of Trust Yourself, described by Susan Cain as “essential reading for every introverted, sensitive professional”.

Listen in is as Melody and Traci take us on a tour of what it means to be a Sensitive Striver, the constellation of challenges facing sensitive people, and how the characteristics of Sensitive Strivers make them the leaders of the future.

 

Episode Timeline

  • [00:09] Intro 
  • [2:20] Melody shares the personal and clinical experiences that led her to the work she does now, including her experience of extreme burnout
  • [9:32] The constellation of challenges Melody sees facing sensitive, Type A people
  • [13:22] Melody’s wake-up call moment
  • [16:42] The Honorable Hangover (a form of achievement addiction)
  • [19:30] The 3 characteristics of the Honorable Hangover (perfectionism, people-pleasing and over-functioning)
  • [24:43] The mindset shift needed for success as a Sensitive Striver
  • [27:27] Melody’s own experiences of being a Sensitive Striver
  • [29:53] Creating intuitive flow (and leaving behind “butt in chair” time)
  • [30:31] Why Sensitive Strivers need processing space and time
  • [31:00] Behind the scenes of Melody’s book-writing process
  • [33:14] How Sensitive Strivers are perfectly placed for leadership and the future demands of workplaces
  • [35:12] Is Sensitive Striving a Millennial thing? 
  • [39:22] Melody’s message to you, if you’re a Sensitive Striver
  • [39:50] Closing
  • [41:10] Outro

 

Resources Mentioned

Trust Yourself - Stop Overthinking and Channel Emotions for success at work (You can download a free chapter of Melody’s book)

 

 

Standout Quotes

  • “I was working with very high achieving, career-driven people and saw this constellation of challenges imposter syndrome, self-doubt, the people pleasing, perfectionism, over-functioning, and really came to see that it fell into two patterns. It fell into a profound sensitivity towards the world, as well as this striving side, this high achiever, pushing, want to be the best and grow yourself sort of side.” (Melody)
  • “The Honor Roll Hangover is usually one of the biggest blockers to trusting yourself and to really becoming a more empowered, balanced, sensitive driver. And with it, some signs of it. You are fixated on goal setting. You set a lot of goals, you enjoy hitting them. But if you don't have something that you're moving towards, you feel like you're worthless, you're never doing enough.” (Melody)
  • “So that's what I would offer people is to think about how you might see those three elements of the honor roll hangover, perfectionism, people pleasing, over functioning coming up in your life. Because really being able to shake that to put in its place is really key to moving on and getting the best out of your qualities as a sensitive driver.” (Melody)
  • “And so the work isn't “butt in chair” time. It's the time that we create so that we can be more intuitive.” (Traci)
  • “(Sensitive Strivers are…) highly empathetic, and that is classic because we need processing time. We need processing space and time. And neurologically speaking, we're wired differently. If you look at research on the highly sensitive brain, we have more activation in areas related to mental processing. So our brains make novel connections. We see nuances, we spot opportunities that other people miss. We synthesize and are able to take in and process complex information more deeply, which is why on your run you're having those great insights.” (Melody)
  • “30% of the population that has this genetic trait difference that leads to a highly attuned nervous system, which is basically all sensitivity is.” (Melody)
  • “you are not crazy for being so affected by everything around you. The fact that you are doing this work, that you are receptive and perceptive and empathetic to other people's needs is your superpower and find other ways to lean into that fully and let that be your greatest strength because it's a gift to yourself and a gift to the world.” (Melody)

 

Connect:

Find | Sidewalk Talk 

At sidewalk-talk.org

On Instagram: @sidewalktalkorg

On Twitter: @sidewalktalkorg

 

Find | Traci Ruble

At Traciruble.com

On Instagram: @TraciRubleMFT

On Twitter: @TraciRubleMFT

On Facebook: @TraciRubleMFT

 

Find | Melody Wilding

At https://melodywilding.com/ 

On Medium 

On Instagram: @melodywilding

 

 

 

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Black Feminism and Sensuous Knowledge with Minna Salami

Black Feminism and Sensuous Knowledge with Minna Salami

October 4, 2022

Hailed as a “blistering new literary voice”, Minna Salami is a Nigerian-Finnish and Swedish writer and social critic, and the founder of the multiple award-winning blog, MsAfropolitan, which connects feminism with critical reflections on contemporary culture from an Africa-centred perspective.

Traci talks with Minna following the publication of her new book, Sensuous Knowledge, which was described by Bernadine Evaristo as “intellectual soul food”. Their conversation is a deep, rich and wonderful romp through Minna’s muti-faceted identity and how her experiences have shaped her writings on Black feminism, Minna’s fresh cultural insights and the need to create space for growth and grappling in today’s world.

 

Episode Timeline

  • [00:09] Intro 
  • [00:57] Meet Minna
  • [2:38] The five(!) languages Minna speaks, and how they have shaped the way she thinks of Black feminism 
  • [10:55] how Blackness is tied to the African American experience
  • [14:50] the impact Minna wants to create through her writing
  • [20:26] Making room for growth and grappling
  • [26:00] Minna’s intuitive writing process
  • [43:12] Having ownership of your inner world
  • [45:56] Closing
  • [46:35] Outro

Resources Mentioned

Sensuous Knowledge (Minna’s book) 

Standout Quotes

  • “Blackness right now is very much tied to the African American experience and the kind of definitions of Blackness as African Americans. It formulates them. And the way that Blackness would be formulated in a kind of Diasporic sensibility outside of America and in the African continent certainly overlaps and is connected. There would be context, sort of dialectic contexts that are siblings, but there are also differences.” (Minna)
  • “I think the closest analogy to how I feel when I'm writing is a bit like an archaeologist might feel when they're trying to find some very specific object and they have to sort of excavate everything that's in the way and remove obstacles in order to gain the kind of clarity of how they might find their objects.” (Minna)
  • “a personal process of growth is of course completely tied to a collective process of growth.” (Minna)
  • “I also started the blog out of frustration and rage, maybe even because of the state of exclusion that Black women face, especially in the ideas world, which is a world that I very much see myself as contributing to, as well as the kind of feminist theory and feminist activism world.” (Minna)
  • “I think there's this invitation that how we move from our unconscious bias is that we do have to begin to learn a different kind of knowledge and we have to make it a regular practice where we're listening to more stories, the land, people from different viewpoints, our own bodies.” (Traci)
  • “...is wanting to think up or to conjure a way of knowing that is simultaneously utopian and pragmatic. There's a lot of radical ideas in the world, many of which I am really inspired by and thankful for but many that I also can feel are impractical and I sometimes approach more as poems or something to kind of plant a seed of something.” (Minna)
  • “I will say that the inner world and the things that you choose to pay attention to, things that you choose to be preoccupied with. Those are the spaces which have not been taken over… And so it's very important, it's incredibly important that you cater to that space and that you have ownership of that space. And it's by no means a space that isn't full of complex feelings. It's that inner world where joy resides, but also sorrow and suffering. But it's the space you own.” (Minna)

 

 

Connect:

Find | Sidewalk Talk 

At sidewalk-talk.org

On Instagram: @sidewalktalkorg

On Twitter: @sidewalktalkorg

 

Find | Traci Ruble

At Traciruble.com

On Instagram: @TraciRubleMFT

On Twitter: @TraciRubleMFT

On Facebook: @TraciRubleMFT

 

Find | Minna Salami

At https://msafropolitan.com/ 

On Instagram: @minnasalami_ 

 

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Being seen, just as you are with Natalie Koussa

Being seen, just as you are with Natalie Koussa

September 26, 2022

In this episode of the Sidewalk Talk podcast, Traci is in conversation with Natalie Koussa, a trauma-sensitive visibility coach and podcast guesting strategist who supports high-integrity entrepreneurs to bring their work into the world in a bigger way.

Traci and Natalie explore how Leadership Designs (a trauma-aware way of understanding how you move through the world, show up, create and lead from your core) can support us to understand our core needs, and the vulnerabilities of letting ourselves be seen, just as we are.

This episode will be a balm for you if you’re feeling the call to show up in your life in a bigger, more true-to-you way. Listen in, and let yourself come home to yourself.

Episode Timeline

  • [00:09] Intro 
  • [00:57] Meet Natalie
  • [3:43] What it means to be seen, just as you are
  • [5:53] The role of relationships in helping us fully step into what we’re here for 
  • [10:00] The experience of living in a country that’s not your own
  • [11:22] Natalie’s decision to leave her non-profit career 
  • [13:58] The impact of the sudden loss of a colleague
  • [19:10] The impact of trauma on how able we are to let ourselves be seen
  • [26:40] The Leadership Designs as a way of understanding your core needs
  • [29:30] Traci sharing her experience as a Visionary (her Leadership Design profile)
  • [31:21] The characteristics of a Visionary
  • [34:35] How can you invite in validation? (The Visionary’s core need)
  • [35:29] Experiences of the Sidewalk Talk volunteers
  • [37:19] The Nurturer Leadership Design profile
  • [38:55] Understanding what we have to offer, just as we are
  • [44:29] Closing
  • [45:45] Outro

Resources Mentioned

The Leadership Designs Assessment

Standout Quotes

  • “I want people to be seen just as they are, and I want them to feel safe in doing so.” (Natalie)
  • “My intention is always that the people that I touch through my work feel closer to themselves than they did before.” (Natalie) 
  • “This is kind of a constant, coming home to ourselves and learning ourselves and being with ourselves, including the bits of ourselves that we really don't want to be with.” (Natalie)
  • “I think good relationships, wholesome relationships are about holding each other in our wholeness.” (Natalie)
  • “(It’s) about supporting people to reconnect with themselves in such a way that they're able to connect with others.” (Natalie)
  • “I think what I'm pissed off about is that even in the personal growth space, there is this mould of the ideal person, and there's also this mould of the ideal growth person. And this idea that growing happens in this one particular way.” (Traci)
  • “I think it's about really intentionally understanding what it is that we do offer when we are ourselves. So not trying to become a louder version or a shinier version, but what do we offer just as we are?” (Natalie)
  • “I love people and I love people's complexity.” (Traci)

 

Connect:

Find | Sidewalk Talk 

At sidewalk-talk.org

On Instagram: @sidewalktalkorg

On Twitter: @sidewalktalkorg

 

Find | Traci Ruble

At Traciruble.com

On Instagram: @TraciRubleMFT

On Twitter: @TraciRubleMFT

On Facebook: @TraciRubleMFT

 

Find | Natalie Koussa

At www.uncommon-people.com

On Instagram: @nataliekoussa_ 

 

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The 3 Flows of Compassion with Dr. Stan Steindl

The 3 Flows of Compassion with Dr. Stan Steindl

September 20, 2022

Dr. Stan Steindl brings a fresh take to compassion in this week’s Sidewalk Talk conversation. Stan’s a clinical psychologist with over 20 years experience as a therapist, trainer and researcher, and he’s also an adjunct associate professor at the School of Psychology at the University of Queensland, Australia. Last year, Stan published his first book: The Gifts of Compassion.

Stan and Traci explore the 3 flows of compassion, bringing a new light to a timeless topic. If you’ve ever been curious about what compassion truly is, how to cultivate more of it in your life, and why it can be so damn tricky to receive… Stan brings some fascinating ideas and practical ways of incorporating compassion into your daily life.

Connect:

Find | Sidewalk Talk 

At sidewalk-talk.org

On Instagram: @sidewalktalkorg

On Twitter: @sidewalktalkorg

 

Find | Traci Ruble

At Traciruble.com

On Instagram: @TraciRubleMFT

On Twitter: @TraciRubleMFT

On Facebook: @TraciRubleMFT

 

Find | Dr Stan Steindl 

At www.stansteindl.com/

On Youtube 

On Instagram: @dr_stan_steindl

 

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Living and breathing the archetypal realm with Kristina Dryza

Living and breathing the archetypal realm with Kristina Dryza

September 9, 2022

Traci and Kristina share a deep and rich conversation, in which Traci asks the kind of big questions Kristina thrives on. Questions like…

  • what is the psyche, and what is the soul?
  • what's the point of Greek mythology and how can it be meaningful?

You’ll leave this episode with a renewed sense of wonder, and a deeper understanding of how archetypes can help us access wisdom and creative energy beyond the confines of our rational mind.

Getting weird and vulnerable with Aziph Mustapha | Aziph Mustapha

Getting weird and vulnerable with Aziph Mustapha | Aziph Mustapha

August 17, 2021

Aziph Mustapha is a weirdo. As the head of culture transformation and employee engagement at Malaysian telecommunications giant, Celcom, Aziph has built a career on disrupting social norms. But being weird isn’t just good business, for Aziph it’s the only authentic way to live. 

On this episode of The Sidewalk Talk podcast, Traci gets to talk with—and really, make space for—Aziph as the two discuss creating psychological safety in the workplace, what it means to be a weirdo in a formal culture, and the importance of vulnerability and authenticity. As their conversation progresses, Aziph gets real with Traci, sharing that he’s struggling to process a number of the tragedies happening in the world right now, including the latest Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the COVID-19 pandemic. Traci thanks Aziph for his willingness to share, and together the two embark upon a time of listening and making space for the other. This is a powerful exchange between two great listeners that you won’t want to miss.

 

Episode Milestones

[00:07] Intro 

[03:02] Meet Aziph 

[06:15] What Aziph makes for breakfast and dinner in Malaysia 

[09:08] Creating psychology safety and cultural transformation in the workplace 

[14:19] Aziph’s vision for Celcom 

[20:46] Being a weirdo in a formal culture 

[25:31] Discerning when to be contrarian versus when to go along with social norms  

[30:07] Volunteering, community, and providing space for one another 

[37:38] Aziph’s willingness to be vulnerable and authentic 

[44:42] Aziph’s word for you

[47:04] Outro 

 

Resources Mentioned

Ted Talk: To Be the Best, Be a Weirdo 

Celcom 

 

Standout Quotes from the Episode

“Every person or group we touch with our business we consider a distinct society, and our job is to advance them in one way or another.”
—Aziph Mustapha 

 “Sometimes you need to make those conscious efforts to change even simple things, like language, simple terms people use to humanize that relationship.”
—Aziph Mustapha 

“Success gives you confidence.”
—Aziph Mustapha 

“You need to grasp on something, you need to have a bit of control in this vast, chaotic storm.”
—Aziph Mustapha 

“Maybe these human beings just talking to each other could help in small way.”
—Aziph Mustapha 

“People need to be listened to, and there’s just not enough people willing to listen to them in the world.”
—Aziph Mustapha 

 

Connect:

Find | Sidewalk Talk Podcast

At sidewalk-talk.org

On Instagram: @sidewalktalkorg

On Twitter: @sidewalktalkorg

 

Find | Traci Ruble

At Traciruble.com

On Instagram: @TraciRubleMFT

On Twitter: @TraciRubleMFT

On Facebook: @TraciRubleMFT

 

Find | Aziph Mustapha  

On LinkedIn: @AziphMustapha

On Twitter: @aziph_mustapha  

 

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